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MFA Names David Flench CEO & President!

Medical Fitness Association Names New President and CEO

June 22, 2021–Pinehurst, NC: The Medical Fitness Association is proud to announce that David Flench, MBA, FACHE, FMFA is the Association’s new President and CEO. The Medical Fitness Association (MFA) is a professional membership organization that was formed in 1991 to assist medically integrated health and fitness centers achieve their full potential.

Flench brings over 20 years of management experience in medical fitness facilities. He received his BS in Exercise Science from The Ohio State University and his MBA from Franklin University. He has served on the MFA Board of Directors and various MFA committees for the past 15 years. Flench is also a Fellow of MFA and the American College of Healthcare Executives.

“On behalf of the Board of Directors, the Executive Board is thrilled to officially welcome David to the helm,” said Jennifer Lavoie, MFA Board member and Director of Employee Wellbeing at Piedmont Healthcare. “David holds a special place as being the first CEO who has lived his career by the programs, certifications, and resources of the Medical Fitness Association.  David understands where the Association comes from and where it needs to go. We recognize this is a critical time for our industry and Association and there is no one better to lead the way.”

As President and CEO, Flench will work closely with MFA’s membership, Industry Partners and Strategic Partners to grow and strengthen the organization. “I am honored to lead the Association that I have been part of for the past 20 years,” said Flench. “I have experienced the positive impact of the education, networking and certifications offered by MFA throughout my career. Now, I am energized to take the organization to the next level. The awareness of the benefits and importance of medical fitness has grown in the past year. We have seen many fitness facilities around the country looking to expand their wellness offerings by bringing medical fitness to their members. The Medical Fitness Association is at a pivotal time in its history to be a leading resource for the medical fitness industry.” Flench has been serving as the Interim President and CEO since the retirement of Bob Boone, the Association’s past President and CEO.

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About the Medical Fitness Association
The Medical Fitness Association (MFA) is a non-profit, 501(c)(6), professional membership organization whose mission is to foster opportunities for the development and operational success of medically integrated fitness centers. MFA advocates for the industry, provides industry standards, educational programs, benchmarks, outcome measurements, professional development, and networking opportunities for the medical fitness industry.

OLC Celebrates its 60th Anniversary!

By Stuart Ohlson and Hervey Lavoie, founders of OLC

On June 15, 1961, mere years after growing up and playing on a dirt road called Colorado Boulevard, Stuart Ohlson hung up his shingle and started Stuart Ohlson and Associates. Working from an office he designed just across the street from East High School, he and his staff were soon busy with a series of residential and commercial commissions.

“All of a sudden, you’re in business, whether you know it or not!,” says Stuart Ohlson, reminiscing about those early days.

Today, that firm has grown and has become what is now called OLC | Ohlson Lavoie Corporation. Celebrating its 60th Anniversary this year, OLC is an architecture, interiors and aquatics four-office firm based in Denver with offices in Orlando, Cairo, and Tokyo. OLC now specializes in recreation, health & wellness, hospitality and aquatic projects. Over the course of those 60 years, OLC has helped change the skyline of Denver, influenced how we exercise, and has changed the lives of its employees, business associates, clients and those who live, work and play in its buildings.

In 1974, Hervey Lavoie joined Stuart, eventually becoming a co-owner in the firm renamed Ohlson Lavoie Corporation. Hervey, a recent architectural school graduate was now in his element. “I saw my new parish church being built as a 15-year-old and thought I could do that and enjoy doing that,” recalls Hervey as to why he became an architect.

A Focus on Recreation 

Early on, Stuart and Hervey managed a small group of staff whose focus was on designing buildings to suit their client’s needs. Commissions came through developing existing relationships, such as those made at Stuart’s standing tennis matches at 3 p.m. on Thursdays. Amazingly, despite the oil crisis of the 70s and early 80s that hit Denver hard, this small firm was designing big, high-rise projects. These included Park Place and Country Club towers near Speer Blvd, several residential towers off of Cheesman Park, and a half-dozen high-rises for the Writer Family at the intersection of I-25 & Colorado Blvd, five of which are still standing. OLC was a small firm with big project credibility. One of those late tennis sessions led to OLC designing its first, standalone, multi-purpose health club, now known as the Colorado Athletic Club–Inverness.

Out of the success and the relationships established with that project, OLC dove right into the fitness and recreation industry. With Hervey leading the charge, the firm has since become a specialist and expert in the fitness and recreation field. He and others have authored articles on specialized design for organizations such as IHRSA, NIRSA, the Medical Fitness Association and parks and recreation departments. OLC staff attend and regularly speak as design specialists at industry conventions and seminars.

A big change came out of that industry focus—travel. Prior to 1984, OLC had never had a design assignment of any kind outside the state of Colorado. Fortuitously, during this time, work out of state helped OLC bridge the periodic economic slowdowns that plagued Denver through the 70s and 80s, (The AIA slogan for 1975 was “stay alive in seventy-five!”). It seemed that there was always a hot development zone in some part of the country…and where the economy was hot, clubs were being built: Dallas in the early 80s; Washington, DC in the mid-80s; Atlanta in the late 80s. In 1988 OLC began traveling to and working in Japan, which became a major source of work during some lean times in the U.S. OLC’s specialized design focus thus meant a steady source of business, but also travel and lots of it.

Adapting to New Technologies

Another big change in those 60 years has been the technology employed by architects. Although every architect was expected to know the basics of hand drafting up through the early 80s, techniques and methods for architects changed drastically and seemingly overnight.

“I remember getting our first handheld calculator in 1974. Our first in-house copy machine came soon after. Then came a fax machine, a multi-line phone, a voice message system, Kroy machine, and Letraset” says Hervey of some the early technology changes. “By the mid to late 80’s, however, it became clear that the fundamental systems our profession needed to use required a different mind-frame and we needed to keep pace. We embraced a succession of technology firsts and broke new ground with overlay drafting, Master Spec, Con-doc, and eventually embraced the inevitable–CAD.”

Soon after came the juggernaut change of faster chipsets, the internet, email, and cloud systems. Today we use graphic and BIM software such as Revit, Enscape, Bluebeam, Sketchup, AutoCAD, and others to communicate, design, document and present. Often a laptop is all the design tools we use; the drafting tables, straight-edges, and rolls of prints of old just a nostalgic memory.

Notable Projects

From its locally focused projects and small staff in the 80s, OLC eventually grew its services and reach by adding offices in Orlando, Tokyo, and Cairo to service local clients. Recognizing that the unique and specific needs of our clients required specialized services we also added an aquatic design department and an interior design department along the way.

In the last few years OLC has designed a variety of health & wellness, hospitality, recreation, and aquatic facilities. Notable projects include:

  • Estes Valley Community Center, Estes Park, Colorado
  • Multiple Buildings for the Saint Francis Medical Center in Cape Girardeau, Missouri
  • Additions and renovations at the Newtown Athletic Club in Newtown, Pennsylvania
  • A new Tennis & Pickleball Center Clubhouse for Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
  • The new Lake Nona Performance Club in Orlando, Florida
  • Lobby and room renovations at Doubletree by Hilton Hotel in Denver
  • A wellness center for Hancock Regional Medical Center in Greenfield, Indiana
  • A Deepak Chopra wellness project
  • Several hospitality projects for a prominent theme park developer in Florida

To this day our firm is centered around our client’s needs and particularly focused on projects that keep our communities healthy—from full-service wellness centers to your neighborhood swimming pool. Our principals and staff have been privileged to work on many interesting and life-changing projects over these 60 years. For that we thank our clients, our consultants, industry experts, the contractors who built our designs and the many folks we have gotten to know along the way.

Reflecting on our past we can certainly say, as the ad goes, “We’ve learned a thing or two.”  But it also sharpens our focus on what matters in a world of continual change: relationships, stewardship, good design, and being open-minded.

Stuart Ohlson and Hervey Lavoie, FMFA are the original founders of the 60-year-old architecture firm, Ohlson Lavoie Corporation, or OLC, as it’s known today.

Click here to learn more about OLC. Note: Hervey Lavoie serves on the MFA Board of Directors.

American Kinesiotherapy Commemorates 75th Anniversary of “Improvement Through Movement.”

Washington, D.C. — April 2021: Kinesiotherapy, one of the oldest therapeutic disciplines, announces the celebration of its 75th anniversary year as a profession.

Founded in 1946 on the battlefield of WWII, Kinesiotherapy (formerly Corrective Therapy) was created by U.S. Surgeon General Major Norman T. Kirk and Dr. Howard Rusk, early pioneers in the emerging field of rehabilitation medicine. With the increased survival of troops suffering from illness or injury, there was a great demand to return soldiers to active duty. Corrective physical reconditioning units were established to enhance this process.

The American Kinesiotherapy Association (AKTA), formerly the Association of Physical and Mental Rehabilitation, was created to support the rehabilitative services of Registered Kinesiotherapists (RKT) while promoting the health and wellness of all populations including Veterans and individuals with functional limitations.

Kinesiotherapy is unlike any other medical fitness or therapeutic discipline because it encompasses the whole body” said Kendall Noble, president-elect of the AKTA. “RKT’s are educated and trained on behavior change in addition to physical rehabilitation.” Kinesiotherapists continue where traditional therapy ends – taking the client from injury or illness to whole-health.

In recognition of 75 years of the profession of Kinesiotherapy, the AKTA is highlighting a few of the specialties that encompasses the best of their modalities. These include:

  • Adaptive Sports including working with amputees and Para-Olympic athletes
  • Aquatics
  • Cardiac/Pulmonary Rehabilitation
  • Driver Training Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics
  • Neurology

The foundation of Kinesiotherapy is in the administration of musculoskeletal, neurological, ergonomic, biomechanical, psychosocial and task specific functional tests, culminating in behavioral and physical modifications.

Dr. Timothy Silver, former Chief of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at McGuire Veterans Affairs Hospital in Richmond, Virginia said, “Having an exercise physiology background makes kinesiotherapists (RKT) well suited for additional sub-specialization in many areas. We have RKTs who provide cardiac and pulmonary rehab, aquatic therapy, driver training, and functional capacity evaluations. The versatile nature of kinesiotherapists makes them well suited for interdisciplinary patient care.

The American Kinesiotherapy Association is a nonprofit, member based organization committed to the support of all Registered Kinesiotherapists across the country. To learn more visit www.akta.org.

Contact:
Kathy Camp
AKTA Executive Director
ExecutiveDirector@akta.org

Beacon Health

Fully Integrated: Beacon Health and Fitness

Check out the February 2020 edition of Club Solutions Magazine for the cover article about MFA member Beacon Health & Fitness. According to the article, “Medical fitness is profoundly changing the relationship between fitness and healthcare.” Read about how Alan Loyd, FACHE, FMFA, has transformed Beacon Health System’s fitness facilities from a loss leader to a profitable, self-sustaining operation.

Note: Alan Loyd was the 2019 recipient of the Hank Boerner Pioneer Award…now you can see why!

CLICK HERE to read the article.

 

Events

Total Joint Care: What You Need to Know in Order to Care for Clients/Patients Pre- & Post-Operatively

 

Summary

Regenerative medicine and joint replacement have become an increasingly popular intervention for active individuals limited by symptoms of osteoarthritis, including pain, stiffness, restricted mobility and loss of function. Since 2014, there has been a 110% growth in these procedures. The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons is predicting a 200% growth between 2019 and 2024. Along with this tremendous growth, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) has cut the number of physical therapy visits provided in conjunction with joint replacement and does not cover the cost of most regenerative procedures. This void provides a lucrative and professional opportunity for the medical fitness provider. This presentation is designed to give the medical fitness professional the tools and resources to work with this rapidly growing population.

Learning Objectives

  1. Utilize evidence based insight to identify the total joint care market from both clinical and financial perspective while elaborating on the necessity to intervene with the joint care population.
  2. Employ standards for preoperative preparation of the patient along with perioperative efficiency enhancements and postoperative protocols for best outcomes.
  3. Utilize the current guidelines for pre- and postoperative treatment of the elective total joint replacement patient and total joint replacement power plan for all patients with elective total joint arthroplasty.

Speaker

Stephen A. Black, DSc, M.Ed., PT, ATC/L, CSCS, CEO and owner of Rocky Mountain Human Performance Center

Webinar: Building a Better Fitness Trainer

 

Summary

What has been missing in the fitness industry for the past century, is a set of principles that explains what makes an exercise “good” or “bad”, efficient or inefficient (energy cost versus degree of benefit), safe or unsafe. As a result, fitness recommendations have been “all over the map”. Exercises that have been deemed “risky” are actually not risky at all, and other exercises that are truly unsafe have been given a naïve pass…simply because no one has been applying a consistent set of rules which determines this. Just like “The Principles of Aviation”, there has needed to be a logical set of guidelines that can be applied to every single exercise, which allows us to determine “what works”, “what doesn’t work as well”, and “why these evaluations are true”, based on physics. That set of principles has now been established, and it will help us build a better fitness industry.

 

Learning Objectives

  • To explain how “off track” the fitness (resistance exercise) industry currently is, and how we got here.
  • To explain the role of physics, musculoskeletal evolution and neurology play in determining which resistance exercises are most efficient, most productive and most safe.
  • To explain the application of the “16 biomechanical factors in resistance exercise” in all target audiences, whether young or senior, male or female, novice or advanced fitness buff, bodybuilder or pole vaulter.

 

Speaker

Doug Brignole, Body Builder and Owner of Brignole Biomechanics and author of The Physics of Resistance Exercise

Note: The Physics of Resistance Exercise is available in the MFA website store: https://medicalfitnessstore.org/

Webinar: Corporate Wellness – Changing Landscape

 

Summary

This webinar is designed to provide an overview of how the new Work From Home (WFH) model has presented new challenges to employees in being healthy. Learn how to be the “go to” centers in your community where WFH employees may attain socialization, programming to reduce musculosketal challenges, recovering health challenges if a COVID patient etc…and more.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how corporate wellness has changed in this past year and the ever evolving needs of employees working in a hybrid model.
  2. Learn how to be able to partner with local businesses to provide health and wellness programs to a much needed audience.
  3. Learn how to make your centers an enticing option for Work From Home (WFH) employees and the various health challenges faced by WFH employees that you can address in your centers with fun creative programming.

Speaker

Debbie Bellenger – Health and Wellness Consultant at Pinnacle Health Management

Webinar: Transforming Fitness Clubs into Health Hubs

 

Summary

This webinar features how to expand your club’s presence in the market to get new members engaged in their personal health and wellness journey by offering quality programming. These programs may create safe spaces for new members to become part of a community that includes exercise options but the carrot is not the exercise that invites them into your center.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn the value of wellness programming as a recruitment tool for market outreach for new members
  2. Learn how to develop and deliver wellness programs to the local community to create a culture of health and wellness in your center to increase stickiness/retention.
  3. Learn the steps to creating your first wellness program for your community.

Speaker

Debbie Bellenger, Wellness Consultant at Pinnacle Health Management